Artificial Intelligence
picture by Jens Keiner
picture by Jens Keiner
picture by Jens Keiner
picture by Jens Keiner
picture by Jens Keiner
picture by Jens Keiner
picture by Jens Keiner
picture by Jens Keiner
picture by Jens Keiner
picture by Jens Keiner
picture by Jens Keiner
picture by Jens Keiner
picture by Jens Keiner
picture by Jens Keiner
picture by Jens Keiner
picture by Jens Keiner
picture by Jens Keiner
picture by Jens Keiner
picture by Jens Keiner
picture by Jens Keiner
picture by Jens Keiner
picture by Jens Keiner
picture by Jens Keiner
picture by Jens Keiner
picture by Jens Keiner

Artificial Intelligence

Entrance fee: 
5 €

Talk Show Guests:

Frank Gwosdz (game ai developer)
www.artificial-technology.com
Verena Hafner (scientist)
http://koro.informatik.hu-berlin.de
Krach der Roboter (musician)
www.monochrom.at/krach
Mathias Fuchs (artist)
www.creativegames.org.uk

Host:
Uke Bosse
www.redbull.tv/Play

Plus:
Krach der Roboter (live concert)
AI Prototyping: a gamestrom experiment - start 6.00pm

Games Culture Circle # AI

AI. Artificial Intelligence. The term “artificial“ often leaves behind an unpleasant aftertaste. It refers to something that isn‘t real, something that doesn‘t occur naturally, but instead is produced, like an artificial hip joint, for instance. From this perspective, the artificial is merely a substitute for real things, such as artificial flavors, and is invariably made from one of the most unnatural materials that exist: plastic.
On the other hand, we think of intelligence as belonging to human beings and other creatures: it‘s something natural. However, intelligence is a complex interplay of natural predispositions, the environment and the individual itself. Predisposition can reach its fullest potential by means of training or education. There is no absolutely precise definition of intelligence. Does that mean that intelligence can only be considered that which is measurable by intelligence tests?

Nowadays, we speak more and more of intelligence in the context of machines. Even today, computers perform tasks entailing a high level of responsibility, whether by regulating the oxygen supply for patients in intensive care units or by operating nuclear power plants and airplanes – under strict human control, needless to say.

The AI we are aware of often consists of cleverly made deceptions. Algorithms simulate intelligent behavior. The machine seems to interact perfectly with us. But in fact, how intelligent are machines? Perhaps more than we think. The time has passed when they were merely time-saving devices. They create convenience. They contribute to well-being.

Many people associate the evolution of AI with the prospect of clear decisions, which take only pure facts into consideration and are not influenced by personal inclinations or selfish motivations. Does AI hold the seed for future democracy? Will robots make better legal judgements? Or can verdicts reached without emotions only be – in the truest sense of the word –: inhumane?
In the more dramatic visions of science fiction these machines become independent and devices develop personalities of their own, acting according to their own standards. To what extent is the will independent from what we call intelligence, or from intentions, ambitions and motivations? Who can say where the demarcation line lies that discriminates between artificial and human intelligence?

Let‘s take this one step further: if we can engineer robots with emotional intelligence, we could have them raise our children, care for the elderly and not just rescue disaster victims but also protect them from trauma.
And we will have a lot more time. Or will we? Perhaps this development will give rise to nothing but increased competition. At what point will we require neuro-enhancements in order to keep up with the machines?
To a certain degree, they assist us in extending human intelligence further that ever before. Not only by means of intelligent learning software (some of which is reputed to be fun), but above all by facilitating communication in whole new ways. With networked machines, the INTERNET, we can collaborate, solve problems together, and crowd-source, no matter where we are, what time it is and which real people are involved.

At the same time, we feed artificial intelligence. Online behavior and evaluations will be stored and remain accessible. It may sound trivial – suggestions to buy certain products that others with similar interests have bought, or by tagging the faces of friends – but with every click we teach the machines. Algorithms make that possible. How long before we‘re walking down the street and a compact Google brand electric car drives up, offering us a raspberry ice cream, just because we thought we might want one, or were just about to feel like it.

After all, who is AI supposed to learn from, if not from us?

Frank Gwosdz

game ai developer

"The most important thing about intelligence is the art of using it."

Frank has been running Artificial Technology single-handedly since 2006. He is responsible for the administration, the Company’s strategy, and global distribution. Frank has 8+ years of experience in the gaming industry and software development. He is a member of the Advisory & Founders Board of the Munich chapter of the International Game Developers Association (IGDA). He holds a diploma /degree in computer science from the Munich University of Applied Sciences, Germany.

www.artificial-technology.com

Krach der Roboter

musician

"When too perfect, lieber Gott böse.“ as Nam June Paik once said. Human brains should not overly be ashamed by almighty processors. Small is beautiful."

Deriving from a secret government project 'Krach der Roboter' was develloped in the early years of the third millenium. After experiments with self-similarity based code structures, Krach refused to provide it's artificial intelligence to maintain authoritarian society structures and devoted himself relentlessly to music, cooking and feeding ducks.

www.myspace.com/krachderroboter

Mathias Fuchs

artist

"Artificial Intelligence Research has undergone massive changes since it first had its glorious days in the 60s. When using gaming environments as a testbed, AI starts from a complex setting - instead of building one from the objectives of the problems under investigation. With Games the problems are already there, and the environment has already been built. Duck and cover for the solutions...."

Mathias Fuchs studied computer science in Erlangen and Vienna (Vienna University of Technology), and composition in Vienna (Universität für Musik und darstellende Kunst Wien) and in Stockholm (EMS, Fylkingen). He holds degrees in Computer Science (Diplom Ingenieur), Electroacoustic Composition, and a PhD (Dr. phil).

Following a commissioned piece for "Synreal: The Unreal Modification", a games exhibition organized by Institute for New Culture Technologies/t0, and curator Konrad Becker, Mathias Fuchs started working on, and increasingly focused on game art.

He has pioneered in the field of artistic use of games and is a leading theoretician on Game Art and Games Studies. He is an artist, musician, media critic and currently Senior Lecturer at the University of Salford. He is also the course leader in MA Creative Technology and MSc Creative Games. Since 2011 he holds a visiting Professorship at the University of Potsdam.

www.creativegames.org.uk

Verena V. Hafner

scientist

"Intelligence can only develop through interaction."

Verena Hafner is a Robotics and Artificial Intelligence researcher. She holds a Masters in Computer Science and AI from the University of Sussex, UK. While in the UK, she also worked for the Game AI Company Cyberlife Technologies in Cambridge, famous for their computer game "Creatures". Verena holds a PhD in Natural Sciences from the University of Zurich, Switzerland, where she worked as a researcher at the Artificial Intelligence Lab. After doing a PostDoc at the Sony Computer Science Labs in Paris, France, she now holds a Junior Professorship in Cognitive Robotics at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin.

www.koro.informatik.hu-berlin.de